Blog Feature – Salummy

This week, The E.i.N blog takes a break from writing, and goes on a Nairobi Fictionspiration Trip.  I will share stories from fellow writers from my area code (254).

Our Blog Feature today belongs to Salummy

The Love Story of the Sun and Moon

Did you know?

Did you hear?

Were you told?

about the love story of the sun and the moon,

and how the sun died each night just to let the moon breathe.

What has he done to prove his love?

or were those endless nights all enough?

talking about a future that he would work on and waking up to booze just like any other time?

Did he prove how much he loved your pretty soul and that never again would he allow you to have your unborns killed?

Did he ever stop you from aborting or even decline to be the father?

What has he offered that we can compare to the sun?

a bouquet of flowers?

a glass of champagne?

or were you just a trophy girl that he used to magnify his earnings?

Did he tell you not to answer Catherine’s call and she is just a secretary?

or did he remind you of the sunset resort where he was busy ogling other ladies in their bikinis?

What does he remind you of?

of endless love or of being a concubine?

I tell you, I will remind you once again

of the story of the sun and the moon.

How the beauty of the moon was the pride of the sun,

and how much the stars shied away each night admiring their love…

***

Thoughts:

This poem reminds me of the song Hijo de La Luna.  Like a folktale, using the moon, this poem draws on the sun and the moon.  Painting a love, that is surely suffocating, as the Sun can only shine when the moon sleeps.  The moon can only shine when the Sun disappears. Such a thought-provoking poem.

***

Salummy is also the author of A Painted Inspiration from the Palm-Fringed Beaches.  A collection of inspiring and life-changing quotes that have been compiled in a style that is simple and compelling.

Buy this book here:

Smashwords

Amazon

Follow her on Instagram.

 

Advertisements

Waiting

light

Waiting

…because,

A Savage Need fills the mind,

the heart, the body,

Violently tight, deep inside,

still, can’t break through,

to the other side.

…because,

the other side seems happy,

filled with smiles,

in their minds,

their hearts, I think,

‘Why can’t I break through 

to the other side?’

Yes…this woman

she’s a child in mind,

Still waiting inside,

for consent to break through

to the other side…

 

 

See Me

see meSee Me

Would you see me, If we had the same skin?

Would you hear me, If I talked like you?

Would you get me, If my ideas were yours too?

Would you hold my hand, If I offered to hold yours?

Would you dance with me, If I listened to your music?

Would you…., would you….Love me,

despite my insecurities?

Despite the fact that I don’t know,

If I can talk like you, think as you do,

Or even dance to your music?

Would you love me,

Just because I’m Me?

Mint & Spice

670px-Mint-leaves-1508

Mint & Spice

You sat next to me,

In the bus heading home,

Your scent; Mint & Spice,

made me wish you’d move closer.

Your thigh brushed mine,

firm, strong: made me wonder,

about you.

Are you Strong?

Are you firm…in your decisions?

The bus went too fast,

Rocked us all over a bump,

I swayed, you steadied me with a chuckle,

the sound of it, so carefree.

When I finally looked at you,

I almost gaped in shock,

Your teeth were black as night,

and all my flowery thoughts,

flew out the window.

I came out a stop away from my usual,

And chastised my imagination,

for making you a wondrous prince,

with just the scent of

Mint & Spice.

Rain on Me

Rain on Me

rain

Fat drops, land on my face,

Cold kiss, sharp kiss,

Startling, refreshing

I shiver;

Minutes pass,

I’m soaking wet.

Still, the drops fall,

Unrelenting.

I want it to stop,

Wish it would stop,

But the rain turns gentle,

the cold wetness comforting,

that pattering;

Drops dancing on each and every surface,

Like music.

I don’t want it to end.

I want the rain on me,

for a little while longer.

this African Girl

This Girl,

she stands,

ready to face the world.

She stands,

with her head held high,

facing you, facing me,

facing countless faces.

In a crowd, a class, on the street,

she stands,

up to judgment,

against the hate,

despite the constraints,

holding on to the support,

she finds in those who value her the most.

She stands,

this African Girl,

She Stands.

Lake Nakuru

Somewhere Else by Mathew Shenoda – Poetry Review

somewhere elseSomewhere Else

by Mathew Shenoda

From the river Nile to the teeming streets of Cairo, from the indigenous, pre-Islamic Egyptian Coptic civilization to an America struggling with its fear of the Arab world, Shenoda’s poems recall the sacred traditions of an ancient, enduring culture as they widen the political conversation surrounding ethnicity, pan-Africanism and pan-Arabism. This notable collection spans generational, political and cultural divides, providing a nuanced perspective virtually unknown in the West.

Publisher: Coffee House Press, Minneapolis

Purchase Here: Somewhere Else on Amazon

 

Favorite Poems from this Book:

Excerpt of Somewhere Else

...
There will come a day when they say: 
who do you think you are 
and another day will come 
for you to tell. 

On that day the story will appear 
but do not tell of yourself 

tell the story of the staff that blossomed in the desert
or the one about your enemy’s greatest victory

tell the story of somewhere else...Read This Poem

Excerpt of New Cairo

…I stand on the balcony, staring

Withdrawn from this poverty by a mere Generation,

Then I remember

Great Grandmother used to say:

“If you throw salt away

God will make you

Pick it up

One grain at a time

with your eyelashes”

Take a moment and just imagine what it would take to actually collect salt one grain at a time with your eyelashes.  Yes, there would be tears, what an impossible task, you’d say.  At first, I laughed at the idea of Great Grandmother’s statement, but then you think about it and it’s eye opening. If you’re desperate you’ll do it, right?  You’ll find a way to collect that salt with your eyes, but what a painful process that would be.  So, don’t throw away a good thing…hmm…

Mathew Shenoda’s thought-provoking Poetry = Stunning, Effortless Truths

Elly in Nairobi Thoughts

Mathew Shenoda writes poetry with a deep love for heritage and culture.  There is always that sense of go back, think about where you come from, how it has shaped you, why you are this person today. I think this book reminds me to remember where am from and where I belong.  Where is home? What does that word mean really?

Time changes, as it must, we all change, but even with change, stop and embrace what your past is, how you’ve gotten here.  What were your ancestors’ hopes, one day you’ll be the one they’ll call ancestor.  What do you want them to think of you?

Meet Mathew Shenoda at the Storymoja Hay Festival:

  Matthew-Shenoda-profile-Masterclass: Critiquing & Editing Poetry
  With: Matthew Shenoda (Egypt/USA) & Ladan Osman (Somalia/USA), Keguro Macharia (Kenya)
  Time: Thur 18th September 2:30pm – 5:30pm
  Venue: Nairobi National Museum @ the STORYMOJA FESTIVAL
 About the Masterclass: POETRY DOCTORS
One of the most essential elements of poetry writing is the process of editing alongside self critique and peer critique. In this workshop we will examine various ways of conceptualizing work as a writer engages the writing process and as a way to gain a critical understanding of one’s own writing. We will then look at a rubric for editing and critiquing that helps the poet reach the aims they set out to achieve in their writing.