Calculating Self- Publishing Costs in Kenya – Non-Fiction Books

Break out the calculator!  It’s all about the Word Count!

So, I’ve had a few questions about what the process of self-publishing a physical book in Kenya looks like.  What does it take?  How much does it cost?  So, let’s calculate it in this post.

Are you ready to self-publish?

Writing in Kenya is a journey! A myriad of experiences that sort of take you through very high highs and low lows, but when you find the perfect fit, you end up in a sweet spot.  You can lower your costs depending on how hard you decide to work.  I can only share a snippet of the journey my sister and I have traveled under The E.i.N Company on our publishing journey.  As you know, or are now learning, hehehe, my sister and I run Amari Baking Center.  The center has published recipe books and a How To book on the baking industry.  To get the Business Baking book published has been quite a process.  I will share some of that with you here, as documenting it all would take a few pages.

Is your manuscript finished? 

This is a question you need to ask yourself the moment you write the last word on the last page of your work.

  1. If your answer is yes, then seek a Beta Reader before you find an Editor.  Beta readers are test readers.  Your first test reader.  You can have one, two or five, have them read your work and let you know what they think.

A good beta reader will give you valuable feedback.  They help you clear your mind, refine your thoughts as you want to lay them out in your book. They don’t mind having a discussion with you about your content, and they save you thousands, helping you refine your manuscript.

Listen to each beta reader if you get five, you can also have just one who really gets you, and that is also important.

Best places to get a Beta Reader:

  1. A Friend/family with the same interest.  Someone who will not coddle you, and is honest about your masterpiece. (I played this role for the project along with two others.)
  2. Join writing groups or critique circles.  Be warned, you might go through a few groups to find the perfect fit.
  3. Online resources – Goodreads has a Beta Reader group, explore it.  Writing.com, join the community and find a group that you’re comfortable with.  You can even get critiques on your work.  Absolutewrite.com the forums are a great resource.  Facebook Writing groups like this one: Beta Readers & Critiques.

Find your right Beta Reader fit.  The person who makes you comfortable enough to discuss your work and how to improve it for the better.  If you are not relating with your Beta Reader, stop and seek a new relationship.  Sort of like dating…hahaha, get your right fit.

Cost in this part of the process: Your Time. Beta Readers are beautiful souls if you find someone willing to gain the experience at reading/editing, it costs you nothing cash wise but work and a willingness to listen to your beta reader.

Once you are satisfied your work is ready, find an Editor.

2. Invest in an Editor.  There is no way around it.  I’m serious.  They are gold to your work.  Find someone who is willing to work with you, and if you find you are not melding with your editor, please, stop and find someone who is singing to you.  That way when they yell at you about the commas you keep adding in the wrong places, you won’t hate them for life.

Our cost in this process was as follows: Cost: 0.20 cents per word, or Kshs. 45 per 250 words. (We had about 35,000 words in the manuscript the end cost was Kshs. 6,300)  The service included the following: 

  • Proofing for spelling mistakes, typos, punctuation problems, capitalization errors, and awkward grammar.  The overall structure of the manuscript.  Which includes managing your content flow, word choice, clear narrative, and offer research help to ensure situations and scenes are factual.

The process took a little over two months as we worked to ensure everything was just right.  Inputting time for Re-edits, and general discussions among all involved.  Quite a process.  When it was done, it was time for the cover.

3. The Book Cover – The first cover for this book was simple.  It cost Kshs. 500 to design.  I had taken on the role of publisher at this point, so we had numerous chitchats, and we weren’t really looking for something expensive looking.  It was an industry book, one we were testing out, so that’s about how much we felt it deserved at the time.  We printed out 50 books to start, but more to come on the printing. Here is the first cover.  Pretty basic, but it was the first, and so still proud of it.

Book Cover1

The second cover we worked harder.  It cost about Kshs. 2,500, and it now included the ISBN barcode.  Very proud of this one as well.

Amari Cover

What to know during the book cover process:  Understand your budget, and the person working with you, and what kind of book you want to sell.  This creation process took a week, though with the second cover there was a lot of back and forth, going almost to two weeks.

Now: The first cover had no ISBN and we had not even gone searching for copyright, so those costs didn’t factor in.  However, it’s good to get copyright and your ISBN the first time you get published. So, here are the ISBN and Copyright Costs.

ISBN – Kshs. 1,500 (confirm with Kenya Libraries on this as you get yours)

Copyright Costs – Kshs. 1,000 (The price at the time, confirm with their site as well)

In total our book cost:

First time Print:

  1. Editing – Kshs. 6,300
  2. Book Cover – Kshs. 500
  3. Printing – (Kshs. 180 x 50) = Kshs. 9,000
  4. Total = 15, 800 (We sold it at Kshs. 500)

We weren’t happy with our first print.  Pages misprinted, and arranged wrong, about 10 of the books were given for free. So, that first time was a bit of an experience.

Second Printing

  1. Re-editing – Kshs. 2, 000 (There were a few changes we needed to make)
  2. ISBN – Kshs. 1,500
  3. Copyright Costs – Kshs. 1,000
  4. Cover – Kshs. 2,500 (included the ISBN bar code)
  5. Printing – (Kshs. 180 x 50) = Kshs. 9,000
  6. Total = Kshs. 16,000 (We sell it for Kshs. 500 still, but now all we need to do is reprint for restock)

A very generous and kind client of ours shared the Publish4All  contacts with us.  A simple email actually. (p4akenya@gmail.com). He said they print really well and this book would come out so well with them.  They were really fast to respond, and very helpful. So, that’s how we redesigned the cover and sent the book to Publish4All for second print.  The end result was amazing and they even helped us sort delivery, becoming our perfect fit at last.

Do note that Publish4All requires you to have your book edited and formatted for print, as well as formatting the book cover for print.  You can reach out to them and learn more.  Remember, word count is key.  The larger your book, the cost rises as well.

So, this is the process of printing a non-fiction book in Kenya.  The end product has 102 pages, and the cover, pages neat and sealed to perfection. You have a snippet of the costs to get you through a first print. Be brave and try and get something printed, it’s the only way to know what works for your work.

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Friday June 8 2018 173
Sis proudly spreading the news! She’s awesome.

With the book in hand, the rest is marketing in all shapes, forms and sizes.

Thoughts on this process:

Before the first print, we had walked all over Nairobi trying to find the best printer.  There was a printer who had the best product, but wouldn’t take our book without us printing 500 copies in one go.  Imagine our shock, that was a low, because we really liked their work, but couldn’t afford all those copies at once.  So, you shake it off, and keep looking. We went to the second, and a third, I think we found the first printer after talking to six printers.

I believe it depends on the amount of money you are hoping to spend, and the end product you are hoping for.  So, shop around, don’t be in a rush, just be sure to have all the information you need before you start investing.  That is what this process comes down to.  An investment in your manuscript.

Then, start marketing like the end is tomorrow.

I hope this post is of insight to you.  I will work at compiling an editors in Nairobi list that you can use for your editing process.

Keep writing, and sharing, let’s get published!

How To Copyright Your Book in Kenya

Copyrights in Kenya

Protecting your work is most important to a creator.  We recently went through this process as we start on actual publishing of real books.  It’s both nerve-wrecking and enlightening.  Nerve-wrecking in the discovery of limitations: like costs and printing drama, and enlightening in that with every book printed, you discover mistakes and tell yourself, I’m going to get that fixed in the next print.  It’s been an interesting time.

So, for copyrights, I thought I should share this process with you.  It’s not so hard, you can do it too.

Firstly, you need to have your work fully completed, and ready to go.

  1. Get a registration form from the Kenya Copyright Board (KECOBO).  You can either visit their offices or download the form from their site.  Here is the link to that →Copyright Registration Forms
  2. Fill out the forms.  To be noted, don’t copyright someone else’s work if you do not have the permissions from the original author (owner of the work).  This is very uncool.  Just don’t do it.  Respect the original author/creator, alright.  Of course, if you are copyrighting your own work, write your name with no mistakes. ^_^  You wanna have bragging rights when you get that certification.  If you don’t understand the forms, do visit the Kenya Copyright board offices and they are very happy to explain them to you.
  3. Take your completed forms to a lawyer.  The wording is “Get the forms commissioned by a commissioner of oaths.’ A lawyer will help you with that.
  4. Attach two original copies of the work to be copyrighted – they prefer it in CD or DVD form. (Yep, that’s right. That means you will have 2 CDs/DVDs. Save it on a CD/DVD and label it.)  
  5. Deposit a non-refundable fee of Kshs. 1,000 in the Kenya Copyright Board bank account.  The form you get gives you their banking details.  They insist on the fee being paid in the bank direct, don’t use bank agents. (Confirm this fee when you get your forms)
  6. Take the bank deposit slip with you to the Kenya Copyright Board offices, and they will issue a receipt.
  7. Certification is issued within five (5) working days from the day of registration. In case there is an exception, they will let you know right away.

And that’s that.

Simple, right?

No more excuses saying you can’t copyright your amazing creativity.

Do you have an ISBN? Here is the procedure in case you want one.

The Kenya Copyright Board offices are here: 5th Floor, NHIF Building, Ragati Road.

Visit their website to learn more.

How to get an ISBN in Kenya.

Assigning an ISBN number to your book in Kenya

  1. Get an account with the Kenya National Library Service(KNLS)  ISBN service here: ISBN website
  2. Create a Profile, adding important personal details.  Please note we did this as a Publishing Co., (request information if you want to do this as an individual.)
  3. Once  you are set up, click on the ISBN Products.  They offer options of buying 1 ISBN, 10 ISBNs,  100 ISBNs to 1,000 ISBNs.  Choose the number that fits your needs, and make the purchase.  This process is easy, and flexible, you may do it in cash, mobile payment, through the bank, whatever works for you.isbn
  4. Once payment is approved, wait to hear back from KNLS.  They are very fast about this, and you will get a message from them giving you your ISBN numbers, as well as the barcode that goes along with it.
  5. Here is a short guideline of how and when to use your ISBN when you get it and what to do with it once you get it. The ISBN site, sends these guidelines to you once your ISBN is approved.

You may allocate ISBN to the following publications:
– Printed books material
– Microfilms
– Educational video or movies
– Atlases and maps
– Publications in braille
– Electronic publications

ISBN should NOT be allocated to the following publications:
– Off print from periodicals
– Advertising materials (sales catalogs, price lists, prospectus, instructions publishing flyers, etc.)
– Wall posters, newspapers, leaflets
– Programs of theatrical, music and other performances
– List of exhibits without additional text
– Curricula of schools and colleges of all kinds
– Lecture and teaching materials of manuscripts character
– Calendars and diaries
– Form and coloring books

PLEASE ALSO NOTE that ISBN should always appear on the verso of the title page, or if this is not possible at the foot of the title page. It must also appear at the foot of the outside back cover at a prominent outside position.

FINALLY, remember that the BOOKS AND NEWSPAPERS ACT CAP. 111, Laws of Kenya, stipulate that every publisher MUST deposit 2 clean copies of their (new, future and back issues) with the Director, Kenya National Library Service, (National Reference and Bibliographic Dept.). This process begins by filling in details under the “My Publications” section when you log into the ISBN service, and later depositing the copies physically at the National Library for approval. You shall not be allowed to purchase further ISBNs until you complete this process for all issued ISBNs.

Now that you have your ISBN, consider Copyrighting your book with the Kenya Copyright Board

This procedure is for a first time buy, for a second time buy, make sure you have met all their requirements on submitting books to the National Library.

The Bachelorette Diaries : 2012 – Book Review

The Bachelorette Diaries : 2012 frontcover

Shiri Golan has found the perfect man at last, but one day skeletons start crawling out of his closet hauling with them betrayal, a dark past and deadly secrets.

Hurt, betrayed and seeking vengeance, Shiri finds herself caught between forgiveness and justice. As she lives on, she discovers that, oblivious to her, she is a commander of some secret movement whose ultimate aim is to control the whole world.

From the sensational love poet and author of Holy Innocence and Holy Crimes, Elove Poetry, comes the story of love, hate, betrayal and secrets.

Book Review
“I’m a bachelorette, happy and enjoying it,” Shiri says at the start.

These words bring out the picture of a confident woman living in the city of Nairobi. She’s comfortable in her own skin, and knows what she wants in life. The Bachelorette Diaries: 2012 starts out as a personal recount of a woman who has it all, except for one thing. She wants to find herself a good man to love and who’ll love her. That right there brought Shiri upfront and center.

There begins the search for the ‘one’. The chapters where Shiri is combing through her social media account for that male friend that could turn into the one, were revealing…I wondered if Elove Poetry had CCTV at my area code. How many times do self-declared bachelorettes spend their nights stalking their male friends on social media, during that lonely period that strikes at low times?

Valentine’s Day draws near, and Shiri’s desperation goes in to high gear. I couldn’t help laughing when she contemplates that TV Ad….”Are you lonely? Do you want someone to talk to? SMS the word “Love” to 5454…” I know you wonder if that would work out if you tried it. So does Shiri…you know things are getting desperate if it’s come to thinking about that Ad.
Coming from that thought, Shiri jumps on to the first lifeboat that appears in the Village Market Mall. Smooth sailing ahead…not….when desperation blinds you to all but what you want, things are bound to get dicey. This moment starts a journey of a betrayal of her heart.

The adventure in The Bachelorette Diaries: 2012 came from the mysteries that crop up after months of bliss in one man’s arms. Suddenly, Shiri is confronted by questions that so often find us in real life. Do we really know the people we claim to love? How can we trust what they say about themselves? Perhaps it has become mandatory to get a friend like Gwen, as Shiri has, who is good at digging out those dirty little secrets hidden behind pretty words and intoxicating love.

Shiri finds herself in a mystery that includes murder, a secret ‘let’s take over the world’ club, and a disease she inherits from a distant relative that might shock you. She gets her heart broken, over and over, from the people she loves. In the end, I think the best relationship she had in this novel was the one she had with her three friends.

Reading through this novel, you get a glimpse into the life of an independent woman living in sunny Nairobi. The highs and the lows she goes through to carve out her position in the work environment, in business, as well as finding that partner she can accept and lean on. There are unexpected moments of impulsive behavior that lead to pleasant surprises, or rather nasty ones. And I find myself agreeing with Shiri when she seeks out an outlet for her many lows through her writing hobby.

The final chapters are filled with rapid action that at times is quite distracting as Shiri works to explain the mystery. For the most part it’s interesting trying to unwind the web, but I confess to getting bogged down just a little bit to the many twists and turns. However, I applaud Elove Poetry for having me glued to my reader for a solid three hours. The Bachelorette Diaries: 2012 is definitely a fascinating read.

Purchase it Here: The Bachelorette Diaries: 2012

4.5 Stars

For more on the author of this book: Elove Poetry books

Elove Poetry

website: https://elovepoetry.wordpress.com

E. A. Friday Feature

Friday Feature1What is the E.A. Friday Feature?

–          Write a story in response to the weekly prompt given of only 1,000 words.  The story can be a stand alone story.  It can also be an ongoing story to which you’ll write chapters every Friday for the feature. You post the story or chapter on your blog on Fridays, and at the bottom, you link your post to the other blogs participating in the E. A. Friday Feature.  There is no restriction on the type of story you create.  The story is all up to you.  The only restriction is the limit on words. (1,000 words).

Who can Enter?

– Anyone willing to show the commitment.  The first Feature Starts on August 7th, 2015.

What you get out of it:

Free readers, for example, if we’re three, you’ll get three new readers to read your story.  Two, your links on the other participants’ blogs could get you new readers.  It’s a win-win for all of us. Every month, the stories are compiled in a free ebook called the East Africa’s Friday Feature, and we’ll publish it on Smashwords for free.  You can use this as a platform to advertise your other work if you have it published.  Share the Free ebook with anyone you please.

(Kindly note, the EA Friday Feature ebook is free, I’ll compile it on my own time, with no charges to you, so don’t ask for payment for your stories.  I’m not going to sell it in hardcover, it’s all going on Smashwords for free download.  Hope you’re familiar with this publishing platform.)

Not Accepted:

– Kindly don’t be late with your post.  Try to be punctual so that everyone can have their links to your post on time. Please show commitment.

– Don’t use an already published story.  This is a creative writing exercise.  Make your feature story original. Don’t plagiarize.

– Remember to follow all the other participating bloggers, if you want to get some love back too. ^_^

If you have any questions, just leave them on this post, I’ll help out however I can.

Have loads of fun with this guys!

 First EA Friday Feature Prompt:

Due: August 7th, 2015

Prompt Is: Caught Red-Handed: Write about being caught doing something embarrassing

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Let’s Talk Money – Self- Publishing

download (1)Is it easy to make money with Self- Publishing in Kenya?

I think on any level, this is a Tough Question. If it’s something you’re thinking about doing, please Don’t quit your day job just yet, you keep trudging on, working your day job and writing fiction in the dead of night.  You’re thinking what a strange way to start a topic.  However, Money matters require clarity.

Options available to you in Kenya:

a) Self-publishing an honest to goodness dead-trees book

– Approach  – Self-Printing at a Printing Press

  1.  To get a dead-trees(actual/physical) book published you’ll find you need to self-publish using an Your storyindependent printing press. You approach them with your carefully prepared work.  They’ll assess it, and quote you a price. For example, 100 books, each at Kshs. 150 = Kshs. 15,000. (This price is for a small book, possibly the size of a prayer book/ Please do shop around to get the right prices offered by different printers) It is your job to handle the necessary copyright registrations, editing, cover creation and all state related business requirements.
  2. Once you’re printed, you advertise which includes: asking different bookshops to sell your books.  You might need to offer invoices, as most bookshops pay only after they’ve sold your books. If you don’t have the influence to advertise your book on a serious note, tackle alternate ways like word-of-mouth, carry your books in a bag, sell to whoever you meet.  Get on social media, talk about it.  You need to price your book, judge this using the cost price, e.g. book costs Kshs. 150 you can price it at Kshs. 350 to cover all the expenses you incurred. If you’re able to sell all copies at once, good on you, if not, keep at it. Remember, this is a self-publishing journey. You learn and don’t quit.  Take this as a business.

– Alternative: Approach an Established Publisher

  1. Watch out for manuscript calls from various publishing houses in the country/ and or continent. They’re announced on publishing company websites and their social media accounts. Work on your manuscript; make sure it meets the specifics given by the publishing company. If your work is accepted, there is usually a monetary reward for the manuscript based on number of words, or the publishing company offers you a royalty payment plan. These conditions depend on the publishing company or publishing house.
  2. You can also submit your manuscript to the various publishing companies in Kenya, East Africa or Africa as a whole. If your work is good, strong, and what the company is looking for, they’ll give you a call and publish your work. You can get a contract of sale for the manuscript, and royalties payment plan. This depends on the publishing house.
  3. These are both great ideas. If you’re one of the lucky ones to get in to this type of plan in Africa, you’re talented and very lucky indeed.

– Approach – Self-Publishing E-books

This is a choice to leap into the international market, with a simple boat and oar in the ocean (^_^ self-pubHehe).  Your product must be great and you must develop a thick skin to survive. There are currently several major e-book publishing platforms in the industry; Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing, Amazon’s Createspace, Smashwords amongst many others. They all offer pricing options using dollars/pounds/ (insert other major foreign currencies) and not our regular Kenyan shillings. But…Don’t despair. Life has gotten considerably easier lately in terms of accessing your money through paypal, and getting checks that require foreign exchange. (Thank Goodness for that)

Your Self- Publishing E-book Options:

  1. Make your own e-book selling platform. – There are those with the know-how and the where-with-all to create a site that allows their audiences to purchase e-books straight from their personal site. If this is something possible for you, then please, go forth and make it happen. You have control over the cart system, and money goes where you direct it, so it can be in Kenyan shillings. It is a perfect way to make it happen. Here’s a Kenyan Author who has done it. Your goal is to let people know where to purchase your e-books and focus on PR.
  2. Choose an International E-book publishing platform For Example, Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing. You’re able to publish your e-book on Kindle anavAmazonLogoFooter._V169459313_nd they offer it across the board on different Amazon markets around the world.  You may also choose to publish on Amazon’s Createspace. TheCreatespace platform allows you to publish physical books and make them available to your audience.  Your job is to let people know where topurchase the book, and get as many people buying.  Amazon pays Kenyans when they accumulate $100 (one hundred dollars) in checkform. This is because they don’t allow direct deposit with Kenyan banks just yet.
    1. There is also Smashwords.com.  This platform acts as an e-book distributor. With smashwordsSmashwords.com, you’re able to get your book in with Barne’s & Noble’s Nook, Apple’s iBooks, as well as Amazon’s Kindle amongst other e-book reading platforms. Smashwords can get your e-book on various e-book platforms.  Smashwords pay through Paypal. This is a beautiful arrangement as Equity Bank has chosen to allow its clients to withdraw straight from Paypal. You get your money easily, less waiting for you. Smashwords gets you paid after three months, and you’re paid as long as you’ve accumulated ten dollars and above. Once again, it’s your job to get people to purchase your work.
    2. There are other e-book publishing platforms like Lulu.com. Explore your perfect fit online.
  3. You can choose to have your e-book available across the board.  Use Smashwords.com, Amazon, Nook, Lulu.com and your personal website.  You may also decide to choose just one platform.  You have the control, make the choice.

Your cumulative sales depend on:

  1. How good your story is. Write well, edit meticulously, and take the time to get a great cover. Create an enticing product.
  2. noiseYour ability to market your book – Since you’re self-publishing it’s your job to talk about your work. If you don’t, no one else will. So, get on social media, blog about it, seek reviews, and connect with your readers. If you put effort in to it, you’ll get sales, which translate to more money for you.
  3. Keep writing new books, the more titles you have, the more likely you are to remain visible on various publishing platforms.
  4. Don’t Unpublish – Think of your e-books as long-term assets. Even if you don’t get sales now, you’ll definitely get someone purchasing it in the future. Some e-books gain momentum after they’ve been published for a year or more. They surprise you one day when you get money in your paypal like a super surprise. Don’t hit that unpublish button
  5. Keep Learning the Writing Craft.

As I’ve said, your written work is an asset, treat it as such, and invest quality time in to it. The more books you have, the more pay. The above doesn’t only refer to Fiction, it can also work on Non-Fiction Books.  If you’re an expert in your field, think about getting a book out. You can also offer your Editing Skills to Authors on the Self-publishing path, and make some money that way too. ^_^

Best Advice someone gave me lately was; – Don’t slack! Don’t give up! Think Smart!

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Self- Publishing Fiction e-books in Kenya – Promotion & Awareness

5. Self- Publishing Fiction e-books in Kenya – Promotion & Awareness

download (10)Books are sold by authorpreneurs who take an active role in publicizing their work. Authors working with big publishing companies are lucky in that they get creative, marketing and PR departments working for them.  You have chosen to self-publish a book. You’re choosing to take on all those departments as well as write more books, that is, Double Duty.  Most African writers end up peddling their books from their handbag as I’ve heard once before. They are their own marketing team, their own creative department, and they are the PR team as well. In between all that, they must come up with the next book.

Don’t be discouraged if you find yourself here. Be strict with yourself.  Take yourself seriously, that means coming up with writing schedules, and promotion plans. Please note if you have an eight-to-five job, this might mean extra dedication, on your part. If you’re in between work or have never had a job and are thinking to self-publish for money, you have more time. Good for you, please use it well and beat down that procrastination monster.

Ways to Promote and build Awareness:

1. Get involved with the publishing industry in Kenya – There are different events that arranged by different Kenyan publishing companies and individuals. Participate in them, let people know you’re writing, and what your story is about. If possible, direct the people you meet in these events to your work. If you tell five people, chances are one or two will read it. If you tell twenty, five or six will get there. So, tell up to a hundred people. The number will grow. You’re building an audience, raising awareness.

2. Utilize your family and friends – they are a powerful network. Take ownership of your work and let your family know that writing is important to you. Show them what you’ve done. They’ll take pride in you, if not; convince them to take pride in you. If you’re having a hard time convincing them, tell them it’s not going to stop so they better get used to it, and start reading your stuff.

There are situations that occur, for example, I have moved countries in the past years. You find that you’re leaving your foundation community for a new one, and you are suddenly the odd one out. You have family but not as many close friends. This could lead to shyness, and/or insecurity. You’re the only one who knows you write – that kind of thing. In this case, take it one person at a time. You’ll find someone who believes in your work and go from there. Just don’t allow yourself to self-publish alone.  It gets tough, so talk about it.

3. Explore the Online Community – Join writing groups on Facebook and other social platforms. Are you on Twitter?  Follow other authors, readers, book reviewers, publishing houses, and other people involved in the book industry. You can also follow your favorite authors. Start a Blog. A blog is essential for any writer. You should have a blog. When starting out, you can share your struggles, and they’ll be many. If you’re established, use it to let people know what you’re writing about. When you’re successful, let people know about their favorite characters in your stories. Blogs are your home online. Please start one already if you haven’t.

4. Your book is your product. Talk about it, blog about it, tweet about it, Facebook about it, create posters, ask for reviews from noiseother bloggers, guest blog on people’s blogs and talk about it. Do you get my drift? Self-publishers sell their work by getting noisy and loud both online and offline.

Remember, it helps to have a quality story that’s worth the hoopla. Although, this is relative, some people have managed to sell stories that aren’t as good. If you have an advertising and selling gene, this is the time to make it work overtime. Get people reading those chapters. Don’t forget to write new stories while you’re at it. New stories are the best form of advertising.

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